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November 2020

Whether you own a home or are looking to buy or sell one, here are some useful tips, ideas and advice. When you’re ready to make your move, let's talk about it!

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Michigan Real Estate
Stephanie Sherriff
Luxury Collection Specialist
2694880417
lofatlaugh@aol.com
www.yourgalinkalamazoo.us

 

HOMEOWNERS’ ADVICE

What’s the Difference Between Modern and Contemporary?

Two words widely used in interior design are modern and contemporary, which sound like interchangeable synonyms, but really have different meanings. What’s confusing is that they have some traits in common along with others that set them apart.

Thespruce.com defines modern design as representing an era that’s passed, while contemporary design is all about the present and the future. Both styles share common characteristics – clean lines, simple uncluttered spaces and artistic flair. But they differ in the following ways:

Modern design began in the early to mid-1900s, when society was excited by inventions such as the skyscraper, jet aircraft, the space program, the cross-country highway system and major scientific advances, such as antibiotics and polio vaccine. The most popular modern concept is mid-century modern, when post-World War II housing was revolutionized by the low-slung ranch-style suburban home. Modernism departed from traditional comfy elements like ruffled curtains and overstuffed chintz chairs and embraced space age simplicity, sleek furniture with exposed legs, geometric lines, and wood accents. Colorful abstract art was juxtaposed against warm earth-bound colors. It’s a great motif for anyone who wants a recognizable design scheme. 

Contemporary design began in the 1970s as postmodernism rose in popularity. It is not tied to a specific era but borrows from past movements such as art deco and modernism as well as adopts new ideas, building materials, and technology, resulting in an eclectic living space. It’s an ideal choice for the homeowner who enjoys change and likes to stay ahead of new trends.

HOMEOWNERS’ ADVICE

Sell Your Home Using All Five Senses

One of the best ways to get your home ready to sell is to remember to use the appeal of all five senses in your marketing. You want your home to look great, and you want homebuyers to feel welcomed by attractive aromas, soothing music and other hospitable ideas so they appreciate the home’s environment on every level.

Sight – Focus on the first things homebuyers will see when they arrive. Make sure the yard is trimmed, flowers are planted if in season or display pots of seasonal plants.  Polish the front door hardware and sweep cobwebs from the entry fixtures. Provide plenty of lnatural light by opening curtains and blinds, and turning on lamps to highlight the features of the rooms. Neutral paint and décor help homebuyers visualize themselves in the home and removes the focus from the homeowner’s preferences.  

Sound – Put on some relaxing music to invite homebuyers to take their time and see the property thoroughly. Check floors for squeaks and fill cracks if necessary  Remove and kennel raucous pets (and their beds, dishes, and toys) during showings. 

Touch – Homebuyers will open and close doors, open taps, and run their hands across countertops. Make sure doors, drawers and windows open smoothly and that all surfaces are sparkling clean.

Smell and Taste –Treat buyers to wrapped chocolates, such as several flavors of Ghiradelli squares. Place a stack of flyers touting the home’s features beside the candy. Carpets, curtains and fabric furniture should be steam-cleaned and all linens freshly laundered. 

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